howllikewolves
fear the fever, Lydia

"There’s a monster at the end of this book. It’s the blank page where the story ends and you’re left alone with yourself and your thoughts"— @NightValeRadio (via asteropes)


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stannisbaratheon:

@WorstMuse is a relic of the human race


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codyaferg:

wow-suchbree-veryblog:

"If white people are so privileged why is there a Black Entertainment Network and no White Entertainment Network?"

"Men don’t have privilege, there are women’s only gyms!"

"Why isn’t there a campus centre for straight/cis people!?"

SAME REASONS WHY IN MARIO KART YOU DON’T GET BLUE SHELLS OR LIGHTNING BOLTS WHEN YOU’RE ALREADY IN FIRST PLACE, ASSBAG.

This is honestly the best explanation I have ever seen.


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http://chasingshhadows.tumblr.com/post/97268000054/bigbardafree-the-thing-about-being-someone 

bigbardafree:

the thing about being someone who’s never catcalled is that you start to wonder why like is it because im ugly???

and then you realize that youre judging your worth by whether or not you are objectifiable to a man and thats so fucked up like honestly its so fucked up

but the…


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"I think it’s weird that teenage girls know more about giving blowjobs than they do about masturbation. It makes me sick to my stomach that so many young girls think sex is just about a guy finishing."—

Elizabeth Olsen 

(via budddha)


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nicomacheannothing:

Anthropomorphic uterus

nicomacheannothing:

Anthropomorphic uterus


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socialworkgradstudents:

korythedirtyracetraitor:

longlivexxxx:

[x]

she was dressed modestly to begin with though wtf

But obviously girl knees are so much more psychologically problematic to a developing adolescent than watching adults wield and flex the ability to humiliate powerless children with the excuse that the knees of children are inherently sexually stimulating


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"

J.K. Rowling’s “Harry Potter” novels have a great many concerns that express the series’ larger themes of fascism, democracy and diversity. Among them is the struggle for the rights of house-elves, who play an enormous role in the functioning of the wizarding world even as they reap almost none of the rewards of the magical economy.

The house-elves emerge as characters in the “Harry Potter” novels much in the same way that children themselves might become aware of the workings of the economy as a whole. When Rowling’s characters initially enroll in Hogwarts School of Witchcraft and Wizardry, they think certain things there come to pass by magic. Food appears, beautifully prepared, on dinner tables. Beds are made, fires are lit.

But Harry and his friends Ron and Hermione come to learn that most of these tasks are performed by house-elves, who work not just at Hogwarts but in the homes of many wizarding families. In almost all cases, they are bound to their employers by magic, which is convenient for wizards in two ways: They can force these virtual slaves to do even the most dangerous and disagreeable tasks, and they can do it without paying the house-elves.

Ultimately Harry, Hermione and Ron decide that their concern for non-magical persons and certain classes of magical beings means that they must become advocates for house-elves’ rights as well.

But that is not the end of their education. They also learn that if you want to help people, you have to listen to what they want and need and respect their wishes. When the main characters in Rowling’s series inadvertently free a house-elf named Winky from her rigid wizard employer, they are initially surprised when she is devastated and becomes an alcoholic. The wizards saw her release as a simple matter of her rights, but Winky lost her home and what she perceived to be her family. Instead of just forcing her out of bad conditions, Harry, Hermione and Ron needed to convince Winky that a new kind of life would be better and then deliver on their promises.

And at the end of the “Harry Potter” novels, the three young characters get a powerful illustration of what solidarity really means.

"— "Why the Harry Potter books are the perfect way to explain Labor Day to kids" | by Alyssa Rosenberg for the Washington Post. (via thehpalliance)


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"If you think women are crazy you’ve never had a dude go from hitting on you to literally threatening to kill you in the time it takes you to say “no thanks.”"— Kendra Wells (via staininyourbrain)


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